Queensland mum fears she’ll die after cervical cancer wasn’t diagnosed

Brave mum who started bleeding profusely at a house party was told massive blood loss was just a heavy period – but has now been diagnosed with cervical cancer and fears she may die

  • Queensland mum Lucy Dolbel had cancer misdiagnosed for more than a year
  • Had a series of life-threatening blood haemorrhages due to inoperable tumour
  • Told the number of blood transfusions she can have in future is now limited
  • Vowed to challenge decision through the necessary political and legal channels

A mum-of-two is in the fight for her life after her cervical cancer went misdiagnosed for more than a year.

Lucy Dolbel from Queensland’s Sunshine Coast had her world turned upside down when she was diagnosed last October after being rushed to hospital for a blood transfusion.

The five centimetre tumour had gone undetected for more than a year after she suffered a ‘massive hemorrhage’ at a house party, which doctors initially diagnosed as a heavy period.

‘It was a bit of a shock as after Googling, we were like these are classic symptoms of cervical cancer that weren’t picked up,’ Ms Dolbel told Seven News.

Lucy Dolbel (pictured with her husband on their wedding day) is battling cervical cancer

Lucy Dolbel (pictured with her husband on their wedding day) is battling cervical cancer

Ms Dolbel opted for alternative treatment as the tumour was too far advanced to be be operated on.

She claims she’s since been told the number of life-saving blood transfusions she can have in the future is limited and will be based on a cost-benefit analysis.

‘If you bleed again, if you’re not doing the radiotherapy and chemotherapy, then we’ll restrict your treatment… it’s heartbreaking, it’s immoral,’ Ms Dolbel said. 

She and her husband Stephen have vowed to challenge the decision by health officials through the necessary political and legal channels.

Ms Dolbel has been rushed to hospital several times in recent months due to life-threatening blood haemorrhages.

Contracting coronavirus has added to her recent health complications, which resulted in a month of extreme quarantined isolation for the family.

‘Several times in the last few months she has been rushed into emergency to receive urgent interventions to save her life, and on two occasions she has even been told to make provision for the fact that she may not survive the blood loss even with such interventions,’ Mr Dolbel wrote on a GoFundMe page.

‘Having to say a potential goodbye to those she loves before she is admitted to theatre has been absolutely heart wrenching for us all.’

Mr Dolbel has given up work to become her 24-7 carer in case she haemorrhages again. 

‘Every single day is like living a loaded gun to your head, not knowing when it’s going to go off,’ he told Seven News.

Stephen Dolbel  (right) has given up work to look after his wife Lucy (left) during her cancer battle

Stephen Dolbel  (right) has given up work to look after his wife Lucy (left) during her cancer battle

He’s grateful for the $13,300 raised in the last two weeks to help ease the financial burden and search for private treatment options.

‘Those who know us both, know that we are very independent people and so the thought of asking for help has to date been something we have sidelined as an option,’ Mr Dolbel wrote on the fundraising page.

‘However, recent events mean that I am now realising it is time to swallow my pride and speak out and ask for help.’

Meanwhile, his wife has warned others to trust their gut instinct and get a second opinion if they feel something is wrong. 

‘You might not have a medical degree but no one will know your body better than you,’ Ms Dolbel said. 

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